Hiking – War History 1944 http://warhistory1944.co.uk/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:27:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-35-120x120.png Hiking – War History 1944 http://warhistory1944.co.uk/ 32 32 Gay hiking, biking and the outdoors https://warhistory1944.co.uk/gay-hiking-biking-and-the-outdoors/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 02:31:32 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/gay-hiking-biking-and-the-outdoors/ A. Book “How to camp in the woods” Trying to go from a laid back glamper to a full-fledged lumberjack? Devon Fredericksen’s Complete Guide to Finding, Equipping, and Enjoying Your Outdoor Adventure has all the tips and tricks you need, from the basics of survival to the essentials of stargazing. $ 21.99, High Country Outfitters […]]]>

A. Book “How to camp in the woods”

Trying to go from a laid back glamper to a full-fledged lumberjack? Devon Fredericksen’s Complete Guide to Finding, Equipping, and Enjoying Your Outdoor Adventure has all the tips and tricks you need, from the basics of survival to the essentials of stargazing. $ 21.99, High Country Outfitters at Ansley Mall; 1544, avenue Piedmont NE; 404-963-2618; in person and online: highcountryoutfitters.com.

B. FLIKR Fire

Take this miniature bonfire everywhere with you! With just five ounces of 70% or 91% isopropyl rubbing alcohol, you have 50 minutes on the fire to warm up or toast marshmallows. $ 95, High Country Outfitters at Ansley Mall.

C. Recon 2.0 MTB Shoes

These shoes are perfect for the serious biker in your life. Recon 2.0 is engineered for performance and comfort, with STRIDE toe-flex technology for natural off-bike movement, a nylon outsole to create traction off the bike, and an L6-Snap Boa and Velco closure at the front -foot to ensure micro-adjustable comfort with safety adjust. They come in a variety of colors, including orange, purple, and black. $ 160, Outback bikes; 484 Moreland Avenue NE; 404-688-4878; in person and online: outback-bikes.com.

D. EVOC CC 21 Hydration Backpack

This practical and ultralight backpack offers easy access to hydration during bike rides and hikes. It can hold up to two liters of water, includes a pocket for your cell phone and is available in black, neon blue and red. $ 70, Outback bikes.

E. Align II MIPS Helmet

Every biker must stay safe! This stylish helmet is economical without sacrificing protection. This helmet features a Tri-Fix Band Splitter, Headset SX Dial Adjustment System for easy fit, 4th Dimension Cooling System for incredible ventilation, and three universal shell sizes to achieve the perfect fit. $ 50, Outback bikes.

F. Bike Tours Atlanta Gift Card

Gift a cross-city LGBTQ history bike tour (or another tour, like the Atlanta Journey for Civil Rights and Sustainability in Action) with a Gift Card to Bike Tours Atlanta. $ 65 and over, Atlanta bike tours; online: biketoursatl.com.

G. Step-Thru Series 1 Electric Bike

Elevate your bike game with this electric bike, powered by Harley-Davidson. The elegant stepper frame makes it easy to get in the saddle and lie flat when stationary. Reaching up to 20 MPH, this bike can totally change the way you get around town. $ 4,999, ElectroBike Georgia; 2484 Briarcliff Rd NE # 25; 404-400-7132; in person and online: electrobikega.com.


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Bow Spider Review: The Solution For Hands-Free Hiking During Archery Season https://warhistory1944.co.uk/bow-spider-review-the-solution-for-hands-free-hiking-during-archery-season/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 18:06:20 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/bow-spider-review-the-solution-for-hands-free-hiking-during-archery-season/ Now you can carry your compound bow hands-free and with minimal hassle, thanks to the Bow Spider. There is always an avalanche of new products and innovations in the world of bow hunting. Many products that I have come across seem totally useless to me. I’m the kind of hunter who never wants to carry […]]]>

Now you can carry your compound bow hands-free and with minimal hassle, thanks to the Bow Spider.

There is always an avalanche of new products and innovations in the world of bow hunting. Many products that I have come across seem totally useless to me. I’m the kind of hunter who never wants to carry the weight of something I don’t need in the backcountry.

I was introduced to Spider bow attending the Total Archery Challenge in Terry Peak, South Dakota. I was skeptical at first. It seemed like another extra gadget product that would add weight to my system with little reward. In this case, I was wrong.

The Bow Spider is a simple and easy-to-use mounting system for your bow, and it lets you move hands-free in the woods.

Read on for my full take on this great product.

What is the arc spider?

There are two main components of Spider bow ascend. The first is the pole, which is attached to your bow via the stabilizer base. The second is the receiver, which is designed to be mounted on you.

There are a few options for mounting the receiver bracket. You can purchase clips that attach the receiver to the waistband of your bag. There are also straps designed to secure the receiver to the back of your bag.

Attaching the receiver to your belt gives you two very convenient options. You can slide the pole into the receiver and just let your bow hang down by your side, or you can pull it across your body and secure it with your bag’s chest strap.

bow spider review
(Photo / Rachelle Schrute)

Letting it hang essentially gives you the ability to let go of your bow without putting it down. If you are standing for a long period of time or watching, you can slide the pole into the receiver in one quick motion and have your hands free.

Bow Spider assembly

The position of the strap holder was a game changer for me. With the bow mounted on my belt, I was able to swing the bow across my body, thread my chest strap through the riser, and secure the bow in front of me. For long hikes, rough terrain, or crossing multiple fences, that means my hands are completely free and my bow is securely attached to my body.

Another feature I didn’t expect is that when my bow is connected and I’m exhausted, I can basically put my arms on it and rest my head on my bow. This gives you the equivalent of a “field office” to lay your head on.

The other option of attaching your bow to the back of your bag certainly has practical uses. If you take long hikes to places where you don’t need quick access to your bow, or maybe you get to land on horseback or mountain bikes, the rear support seems like a good one. solid option. I didn’t use it on the back of my bag.

I usually hunt in areas where I want my bow to be easily accessible, and I happen to be a little human. To mount your bow on your back with the bow spider without removing your bag, you need to swing your bow over your head.

For some, this can be an easy task. For me, not so much.

The rainbow spider in action

bow spider review
The Bow Spider in slingshot mode. (Photo / Rachelle Schrute)

This year I used the Bow Spider my entire archery season. I hiked very steep terrain, crossed several streams and countless fences.

The whole time I was moving my bow was in this forward sling position. My hands were both free which gave me more stability and agility, with the added benefit of eliminating the hand / arm fatigue that comes with carrying your bow manually.

In cases where I wanted to drop my bag and move faster through thick wood, I unclipped my chest strap, lowered the bow, and lifted it off the receiver. It’s quick and easy, meaning I could drop my bag down pretty quickly and go with my bow in hand.

A huge bonus: use in your vehicle for safe storage

bow spider review
An ingenious means of transport for your bow; (photo / Rachelle Schrute)

The next thing I’m about to tell you is not listed as intended use. It’s my little idea. Not for honking, but BEEP BEEP.

Because I didn’t intend to use the straps to mount my second Bow Spider to the back of my bag, I instead mounted it in the back of my driver’s seat. That alone is a reason to buy one. It gives you a quick and safe place to mount your bow in your vehicle. I hate having a big, bulky case and hate having my bow just resting in the backseat, especially when my quiver is full of broadheads.

This solution keeps your bow safe and quickly accessible. I went a little further and made a small incision in the base of my seat, threaded a Velcro strip through it, and attached the lower limb to the metal frame of my driver’s seat. This means the bow doesn’t wiggle even on the roughest roads.

Where it could be better

No product is flawless. Unfortunately, the Bow Spider certainly has one. It all comes down to the post. The metal mounting piece that attaches to the actual bow has two drawbacks.

The first is simple: it adds weight. Can’t tell if the weight is noticeable to me, but if you count ounces it’s worth noting.

The second fault is a big problem that I am still trying to resolve. The pole is secured by removing your stabilizer, lining up the hole in the Bow Spider pole with the mounting hole on your bow, then reattaching your stabilizer. For this reason, if you have the style of stabilizer that twists instead of bolting, the weight of your bow on the pole almost always loosens your stabilizer.

After an entire season of hunting with the Bow Spider, I finally got into the habit of quickly turning my stabilizer every time I pick it up.

This is not ideal but will not prevent me from using the Bow Spider either. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.

Final thoughts

I love this thing. I think a definitive way to decide whether or not you like a product is to go out there without it after you’ve used it for a while.

Unfortunately my vehicle was broken into after the opening weekend of the rifle season this year. One of the items taken was my hunting bag, and my bow spider was attached to my bag. I then went on a few more archery hunts, only to find myself distraught without being able to easily tie my bow to myself. It really felt like I was struggling in a way that I hadn’t had all season.

That alone will be the reason I will be replacing my stolen Bow Spider before next season. It’s a solution to a problem I didn’t even know I had, and it dramatically improved my ability to move around the field.


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Dog friendly hiking trails for your next Cape Town adventure https://warhistory1944.co.uk/dog-friendly-hiking-trails-for-your-next-cape-town-adventure/ Sun, 14 Nov 2021 06:00:53 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/dog-friendly-hiking-trails-for-your-next-cape-town-adventure/ Let’s face it, our furry friends are the best outdoor companions and if you are an avid hiking enthusiast, wanting to be able to explore the beauty of Cape Town with your fluffy pal by your side, then we have great news. There is no shortage of dog friendly hikes in Mother Town, so here […]]]>

Let’s face it, our furry friends are the best outdoor companions and if you are an avid hiking enthusiast, wanting to be able to explore the beauty of Cape Town with your fluffy pal by your side, then we have great news. There is no shortage of dog friendly hikes in Mother Town, so here are some hiking trails for your next amazing adventure:

Newlands Forest via the Contour Path

Newlands Forest is a gem for locals and lovers of tranquility, and we can see why. This lush scenic getaway offers epic mountain views and an abundance of greenery. Years ago this forest was part of the Khoi migratory path, but today it is a hot spot for those seeking adventure. A place where people from all walks of life can meet and take their dogs for a relaxing walk or a cheeky trail.

Cecilia Forest

This majestic loop trail is home to lush streams and trees, and the waterfall is the scenic highlight of the experience. Travel this route primarily used for running and walking. But keep an eye out for a few choppy tails throughout this spectacular trip.

Kloof Nek’s Pipe Track

The Kloofnek Pipe Track is an amazing path that follows the outline of the iconic Table Mountain. Enjoying a breathtaking view of Camps Bay, you will inevitably be on the left ohhhh and ahhhh. It’s a popular weekend activity for Capetonians and their beloved dogs.

Elephant eye

Elephant’s Eye is a 5.3 mile trail located near Noordhoek, often capturing the attention of explorers with a passion for cave adventure. Your dog will love walking around this picturesque paradise.

Please note:

Areas that are part of Table Mountain National Park require dog walkers to have a Level 1 Activity Permit, which can be purchased for R320 from the Tokai Plantation Office, Tokai Road Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The permit is valid for 12 months from the date of purchase. A maximum of two dogs is allowed.

Read also :

Secret caves to explore in and around Cape Town

Image: Unsplash / Scott Osborn



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Our Mother-Son Hike Was Troubled, But It Healed Something In Us After So Long Inside | Meg hitchick https://warhistory1944.co.uk/our-mother-son-hike-was-troubled-but-it-healed-something-in-us-after-so-long-inside-meg-hitchick/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/our-mother-son-hike-was-troubled-but-it-healed-something-in-us-after-so-long-inside-meg-hitchick/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 05:41:00 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/our-mother-son-hike-was-troubled-but-it-healed-something-in-us-after-so-long-inside-meg-hitchick/ I won’t lie: the huge tree that toppled without warning was disturbing. The evening had been otherwise calm, without a breath of wind since before nightfall. The only other sounds in the valley were the songs of owls and frogs, and the four of us were literally a mile away from it all, the closest […]]]>

I won’t lie: the huge tree that toppled without warning was disturbing.

The evening had been otherwise calm, without a breath of wind since before nightfall. The only other sounds in the valley were the songs of owls and frogs, and the four of us were literally a mile away from it all, the closest sign of civilization being a trail of fire over an hour away. walk north. Our 11-year-olds were already zipped into their sleeping bags, but not yet asleep. My comrade “adventure mom” and I were about to spend a night and crawl into our respective tents, when suddenly: a noise BREAK, followed by a huge rolling crunch from somewhere on the hill above.

During that long roaring moment, my body froze as my mom’s brain began to roar. What is that? Was the whole hill about to fall on us in an avalanche? By choosing this place to camp, have I doomed us all? What are we even doing here hiking in the middle of nowhere with randomly falling wood when we could be home, tucked away safely in our perfectly good beds?

Fortunately, by the time the roar died down and the worried little voice cried out from the tent (“Mum? Mum ?! was that ?! My own voice sounded quite calm. “Just a falling tree, baby.” It won’t hurt us. Go to sleep. I will be next to you soon. Turns out an 11-year-old boy is tall and brave enough to carry a backpack, hurtle down a rocky hill, jump feet first into a dark pool atop a waterfall, and watch for snakes in the brush. – but not too tall or brave for the reassuring proximity of his mother in the unknown darkness.

By morning we were frozen but unharmed, and the Tale of the Falling Tree had become exactly that – a new legend, a story our young warriors were to tell about the danger faced and survived on their journey through the wilderness. We laughed around our hotplates at the fright of those few seconds, as the kids rushed off, hitting things with sticks. We traded field notes from the night’s experience: who had the worst sleeping bag, who heard the wombat sniffing around the campsite, who smelled the worst. We ate gooey porridge and struggled to put everything back in the hiking bags. The water filter broke, so we proceeded to carefully boil several gallons of stream water to drink. We climbed the steep, now warm hill, making our way through the thick fern stands. None of this seemed to be the kind of thing you would call ‘fun’, and yet when our little troop came out tired, bug-bitten and victorious in the bush, the boys moaned that they didn’t want the trip. ends, and started pestering us for the next one.

It is a strange phenomenon, this “type 2 fun”, in which difficult, frightening or uncomfortable experiences become the material of happy memories. As I explained to my backpacker friends on a difficult part of the walk, this kind of fun is best when you don’t have it anymore. It is the joy of living in its purest form to tell the story.

The concept of enjoying self-inflicted hardships in nature is not new to me. I’ve done quite a few outdoor adventures in my 40s and you learn to revel in the roughness of it all. It hardly occurs to me to ask “why?” »Why carry all the equipment on my back when I could pay for a more pleasant stay? Why punish me for a long hard walk when I could drive? Why go in search of these adventures?

The Falling Tree reminded me to ask these questions because the uncomfortable truth is that the outdoors has inherent dangers. Things can and do go wrong on the trail. Despite my oft-stated ambition to be “the prepared walker I would like to meet if I got into trouble in the bush”, there is no consideration of all possibilities – as the broken water filter proves. , the tree, inadequate sleeping bags and countless other little hiccups. Taking young children into the unknown sounds like a special gamble. When my friend and I decided on this trip with our boys, we thought we knew our “why”. “It’ll be fun!” we said to each other. “They need exercise! Children need to be in the bush – to be free to run, roam and be loud! “

I suspect we are both instinctively looking for an antidote to a snowball of parental guilt – in my case, brought on by the Great Screen Binge of 2021. We did a year of Netflix a week and watched probably half of YouTube. This led to a withdrawal process akin to harsh substance detoxification: mood swings, temper tantrums, devious behavior (and possibly criminal activity, as far as I know). The regret of the screen definitely played a role in my decision to launch our adventure far beyond the reach of 4G.

“By opening up to this kind of risk and sharing adversity with our little people, we gently reminded ourselves of the beautiful fragility of life.” Photograph: Supplied

The benefits of hiking in nature are well demonstrated. Forest baths are proven to improve mental well-being, and the simple process of walking has a medicinal effect on the brain and body. But by taking the risk of a mother-son bush trip, we got more than we expected. As we pushed the physical limits and forced our bodies (and our sons) to feel that tinge of fear and doubt, we felt like we healed a loophole in ourselves, something damaged by many pandemic months of the past. curl up inside, wallow in the need for avoidance behavior.

Our children embraced nature with abandon. Sitting and watching the sunset, we tried not to flinch or pamper as the boys precariously jumped through a waterfall, screaming and laughing. I realized that by opening up to this kind of risk, and by sharing adversity with our little people, we gently remember the beautiful fragility of life. From this awareness comes connection, and from vulnerability comes resilience.

After only a weekend, the gratitude we feel for the tree and for being able to breathe the next breath runs deep.

Meg Hitchick is a midwife, teacher and campus coordinator of an alternative high school for vulnerable youth with a focus on wellness and resilience. She lives in the NSW area with her partner, three sons and two dogs


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Cody Yellowstone: Discover Park County’s Best Hiking Trails https://warhistory1944.co.uk/cody-yellowstone-discover-park-countys-best-hiking-trails/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/cody-yellowstone-discover-park-countys-best-hiking-trails/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 17:34:33 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/cody-yellowstone-discover-park-countys-best-hiking-trails/ Start your November off on the right foot with the latest episode of Outside of Yellowstone! Watch the video and join Shalee Super as she gives you an overview of favorite #hiking trails throughout County Park. This is the last video in the series and it’s about hiking with some really interesting spots and a […]]]>

Start your November off on the right foot with the latest episode of Outside of Yellowstone! Watch the video and join Shalee Super as she gives you an overview of favorite #hiking trails throughout County Park. This is the last video in the series and it’s about hiking with some really interesting spots and a few “factoids” for good measure.
While you are encouraged to enjoy this video from anywhere, you are welcome to subscribe to the #OutsideYellowstone channel today for great travel guides and videos highlighting all of the amazing outdoor activities you can find. Park County, Wyoming has to offer.

Families, individuals and couples are invited to have a true Western experience surrounded by mountains and wild animals, with clean, fresh air and cool powder. Great skiing, both downhill and Nordic, and snowshoes with miles of groomed ski and snowshoe trails await you with discounts for multiple nights and / or Ski & Stay offers with discounts on lift tickets. No skis? No problem! Possibility to rent skis and snowshoes.

Do you start watching vacation movies now and yearn for the beautiful boutiques, exceptional decor, and the quaint beauty and bounty of a vacation that seems to live and breathe only on movie sets? If you are looking for the perfect opportunity to reunite with your girlfriends on a holiday shopping adventure that is truly Wyoming, unaffected by supply chain issues, and full of unique and thoughtful gifts worthy of your time. ‘be offered, you will find the nearest Cody. thing in one’s real life Branded Holiday Movie. Indulge your senses in what has been called “the authentic vibe of a western town, Cody embodies the true spirit of the west more than any other town in the state”, by the freelance writer Caryl Ramsey, Only in your state.

And remember, Outside of Yellowstone is Wyoming’s destination for great adventures any time of year. And when your family adventure involves cutting a special Christmas tree for the perfect holiday decor and creating those memories that will last a lifetime, we’ve got you covered!

Maybe your near future has a romantic getaway for two, with world-class dining and true luxury western accommodation, so pack your matching flannel pajamas and let us extend the warmest of welcomes to you! For families feeling disconnected and yearning for a family reunion, plan now to make this holiday gathering an event the whole family will love and cherish, with accommodations and activities that everyone will enjoy – museums. to a snowmobile ride in Yellowstone – think of it as your vacation adventures with sugar on top!

This is your official invitation to obtain Outside of Yellowstone, plan today and warm up with Cody Yellowstone!

Presented by Cody Yellowstone, inviting you out of Yellowstone. Start planning today by requesting your FREE Adventure Guide whether it’s for a day, a lifetime, or any time in between.


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How to Avoid Muscle Cramps When Hiking in Cold Weather https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-avoid-muscle-cramps-when-hiking-in-cold-weather/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-avoid-muscle-cramps-when-hiking-in-cold-weather/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 14:00:50 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-avoid-muscle-cramps-when-hiking-in-cold-weather/ Pixabay As we move into fall and winter and the weather continues to turn cold, it’s likely that some people will just move their fitness routines indoors and stop many outdoor activities. If you enjoy cold weather camping or cold weather outdoor activities in general, there are a few more basic tips you can use […]]]>
Pixabay

As we move into fall and winter and the weather continues to turn cold, it’s likely that some people will just move their fitness routines indoors and stop many outdoor activities. If you enjoy cold weather camping or cold weather outdoor activities in general, there are a few more basic tips you can use to continue enjoying the outdoors even in the coldest conditions. While the cold can lead to muscle cramps and sore, overworked muscles, there are a few precautions you can take to make sure your body is prepared for freezing temperatures.

Why cold weather causes cramps

Unhappy man with injured painful leg sitting on snowy road.

If you’ve had muscle cramps more frequently while working out, spending time outdoors, or running in cold weather, you know winter can take its toll on your body. However, you might not know why. When temperatures drop, muscles lose the heat they produce more quickly. As the muscles lose their heat, they tend to tighten and contract, which also causes the joints to tighten.

Such an impact on the muscles can make them sore for a longer period of time. It’s also worth noting that muscles have to work harder in cold weather to do the same amount of work as they would in hot weather. While you can’t change the weather, luckily there are several practices you can adopt to ensure your body is protected and ready to perform all winter long.

Warm up thoroughly

man stretches before outdoor workout.

One of the best tips for preventing muscle cramps and aches during the winter months is to warm up properly. During the warm or even hot months, when the muscles are already softer, it may be tempting or even practiced regularly for some people to skip their warm-up. However, in cold weather it is much more necessary to give your body the time it needs to warm up before demanding high performance tasks or movements.

To warm up the muscles and keep the blood flowing, there are a number of exercises you can do. Walking at a brisk pace is a good option, as is slow, careful jogging. Stretching and aerobic movements such as punches or easy kicks are also good options.

Finally, be sure to dedicate enough time to your warm-up. Temperatures between 35 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit require at least a 10-minute warm-up. For temperatures below 35 degrees, plan to add an additional five minutes to your warm-up for every 10-degree drop in temperature. This means that a 15 minute warm up is required for 25 degree conditions.

Hydrate properly

runner stops to drink water from his travel bottle.

Staying hydrated during physical activity is always important. But staying hydrated during exercises and activities in cold weather is even more important, especially for preventing muscle cramps and pain. Dehydration is a major cause of muscle cramps, so even if it is cold, you should make sure to drink plenty of water before, during, and after outdoor winter exercise.

Avoid relying on diuretics such as hot coffee and tea which actively dehydrate and stick to plain water. If you really hate drinking cold or room temperature water in winter, you can always heat your water. It’s a simple way to hydrate easily.

Consider adding heat

person walking with ski poles on the ridge of a snowy mountain.

Finally, adding warm compresses or hand warmers to your diapers before you go is another great way to keep your muscles warm. However, this is not a way to jump or avoid a warm up. When applied to your body, the heat helps stimulate blood circulation and relieve tension from sore or tense muscles. This will not only help the existing tendencies to muscle cramps, but will also help prevent more of it.

If wearing a thermal pad isn’t an option, consider adding a warm bath with Epsom salts to your evening routine. The salts and hot water will help relieve any pain or stiffness you might feel while working or exercising in cold weather.

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Why I love hiking during shoulder seasons in Maine https://warhistory1944.co.uk/why-i-love-hiking-during-shoulder-seasons-in-maine/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/why-i-love-hiking-during-shoulder-seasons-in-maine/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 21:58:00 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/why-i-love-hiking-during-shoulder-seasons-in-maine/ The beach stretched out in front of us, empty and undisturbed by footprints. With the freedom to sit anywhere for our picnic, I walked my dog ​​Juno along the shore to a sunny stretch of sand. Schoodic Beach on Donnell Pond is a popular spot during the summer, with shallows perfect for swimming. The tent […]]]>

The beach stretched out in front of us, empty and undisturbed by footprints. With the freedom to sit anywhere for our picnic, I walked my dog ​​Juno along the shore to a sunny stretch of sand.

Schoodic Beach on Donnell Pond is a popular spot during the summer, with shallows perfect for swimming. The tent sites are tucked away in the woods along its edge, with picnic tables, fire pits, and outhouses. Mingling with hikers and campers, boaters often stop as they explore the crystal-clear pond.

But on that sunny Tuesday in early November, Juno and I had the beach to ourselves. And before that, on our hike up and down nearby Schoodic Mountain, we hadn’t encountered anyone. That’s one thing I love about hiking in the shoulder season: the solitude.


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With the closure of the hiking trails, the winter season in the High Tatras begins https://warhistory1944.co.uk/with-the-closure-of-the-hiking-trails-the-winter-season-in-the-high-tatras-begins/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/with-the-closure-of-the-hiking-trails-the-winter-season-in-the-high-tatras-begins/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 10:29:57 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/with-the-closure-of-the-hiking-trails-the-winter-season-in-the-high-tatras-begins/ Hikers, who are expected to follow Covid updates for the High Tatras region, can now download a map of open hiking trails. Due to the approach of the winter season, the hiking trails in the High Tatras were again closed on the first day of November. “Right now nature and animals are enjoying the winter […]]]>

Hikers, who are expected to follow Covid updates for the High Tatras region, can now download a map of open hiking trails.

Due to the approach of the winter season, the hiking trails in the High Tatras were again closed on the first day of November.

“Right now nature and animals are enjoying the winter rest they need,” said the High Tatras Tourism Association.


Tatras Travel Guide: A fresh take on the amazing soul of Slovakia.

The seasonal closure of hiking trails lasts from November 1 to June 14, but that does not mean that the High Tatras will be completely closed to hikers and tourists. Although several trails leading to peaks and saddles and even the Chata pod Rysmi mountain hut are now closed, there are other trips people can take.

Where to hike in winter

These include a hike to Sedlo pod Ostrvou, which starts right above the Popradské pleso mountain lake, as well as trips to the Skok waterfall, several mountain lakes such as Jamské pleso, Batizovské pleso under the foot of the highest summit of Slovakia Gerlach and Biele pleso. The Slavkovská vyhliadka viewpoint, the popular resort town of Hrebienok, as well as 12 mountain huts are also open to tourists all year round.

The High Tatras Tourism Association has created a map with winter hiking tips, which can be downloaded here.

In addition to hiking in winter, tourists can go skiing, tobogganing, cross-country skiing and ski touring, which is possible from December 15 to April 15 during good snow conditions.

Well-prepared hikers

The association warns hikers not to forget warm clothes, appropriate shoes, traction crampons, hot drinks, mountain rescue insurance and weather information to have a pleasant and safe time in the mountains.

“Anyone who stays in the High Tatras region and pays the tourist tax is automatically insured for the intervention of the mountain rescue service”, adds the association.

It is also possible to take out this insurance quickly at the tourist offices of Starý Smokovec and Tatranská Lomnica.

Restrictions related to Covid

Because the third pandemic wave is well underway, tourists should follow the latest regional Covid rules and information available here.

From November 1, the Poprad district and the High Tatras region are at black level on the Covid map, which means, for example, that accommodation will only be possible for work and quarantine purposes.


Read also:New attraction in the Low Tatras fascinates and worries hikers Read more

Restaurants will sell food through their elevator-free windows. The wellness facilities will not be open at all. However, the restrictions do not apply to outdoor activities and hikers can thus explore the popular peaks and lakes of the Tatras.


Spectacular travel guides in Slovakia

2. Nov 2021 at 11:29 | Compiled by spectator staff


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New hiking trails open at TNC Moshassuck River Preserve – ecoRI News https://warhistory1944.co.uk/new-hiking-trails-open-at-tnc-moshassuck-river-preserve-ecori-news/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/new-hiking-trails-open-at-tnc-moshassuck-river-preserve-ecori-news/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 13:46:16 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/new-hiking-trails-open-at-tnc-moshassuck-river-preserve-ecori-news/ By ecoRI News staff The Nature Conservancy recently opened its 25th nature reserve in Rhode Island, the Moshassuck River Preserve in Lincoln. Formerly a Boy Scout property called Camp Conklin, the new reserve features 3 miles of marked trails, laid out on 210 acres of southern New England deciduous forest. The increased public interest in […]]]>

By ecoRI News staff

The Nature Conservancy recently opened its 25th nature reserve in Rhode Island, the Moshassuck River Preserve in Lincoln. Formerly a Boy Scout property called Camp Conklin, the new reserve features 3 miles of marked trails, laid out on 210 acres of southern New England deciduous forest.

The increased public interest in outdoor recreation was one of the main factors behind the decision to open the reserve, according to The Nature Conservancy (TNC). Owned by TNC and protected from development since the 1990s, it was managed primarily as wildlife habitat, with no parking areas or trailheads until last month.

“We are thrilled to open the Moshassuck River Preserve to the public,” said Scott Comings, associate state director for the Rhode Island chapter of TNC. “TNC maintains approximately 90 miles of trails in Rhode Island, and visitor numbers are on the rise on all of our reservations.”

TNC thanks neighboring landowners for their help in resolving potential obstacles to opening the reserve. The Fairlawn Golf Course has voluntarily constructed a 15-car parking area for the reserve, with a shared entrance on Sherman Avenue. The MacColl YMCA on Breakneck Hill Road was home to existing historic trails that leave the reserve and pass through YMCA property. The YMCA and TNC agreed that the issue could be resolved through signage rather than relocation of trails.

The Moshassuck River Preserve features a shaded canopy of hickory and oak trees, glacial boulders, a meandering river and small streams.

The trailhead for the 3 mile trail system is near the first tee of the golf course. The Blue Trail follows the Moshassuck River, then climbs to higher ground before descending through a boulder field. The yellow trail crosses several tributaries of the Moshassuck and passes a historic cemetery, with graves marked by simple fieldstones.

Dogs are allowed in the reserve but must be kept on a leash at all times, for the good of the wildlife and the enjoyment of other visitors in complete safety.

TNC established the Moshassuck River Reserve with support from the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management’s Open Space Grants program, the Champlin Foundation, the Bafflin Foundation, the AMICA Business Foundation and individual donors.


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How to deal with grief? Try hiking, biking, canoeing 150 miles https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-deal-with-grief-try-hiking-biking-canoeing-150-miles/ https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-deal-with-grief-try-hiking-biking-canoeing-150-miles/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://warhistory1944.co.uk/how-to-deal-with-grief-try-hiking-biking-canoeing-150-miles/ The Wisconsin River cuts a brown snake through dense Midwestern forest, perhaps 300 meters in diameter. We paddle along the south shore, chasing the bubbles that indicate a faster current. Five days and 125 miles, I’m exhausted. We are all. Fifty miles on foot. Fifty miles by bike. Now 25 miles to go in our […]]]>

The Wisconsin River cuts a brown snake through dense Midwestern forest, perhaps 300 meters in diameter. We paddle along the south shore, chasing the bubbles that indicate a faster current.

Five days and 125 miles, I’m exhausted. We are all. Fifty miles on foot. Fifty miles by bike. Now 25 miles to go in our green canoe.

A September breeze softens the harsh sun. Paddles dig in the water. I settle in perfect calm – until someone shouts behind me.

There are 10 men in our group, in five canoes spread out over the water. We turn to find the doctor and the pastor stuck on a submerged tree. As we all shout instructions, they try to paddle forward, then back, but their canoe doesn’t move. Another team tries to tow them, to no avail. My mind is racing with nightmare scenarios. What if they capsize? What if they fall underwater and get stuck in the branches?

The pastor (wearing a sky blue T-shirt) treats his fellow travelers with a campfire story.
Photograph by Spenser Heaps

I had envisioned this trip as a celebration, an ordeal, a respite from anguish. I named it 50-50-50 in honor of my impending 50th birthday. But honestly, the past year had been horrible. I had survived COVID-19, like my children, to watch my mother succumb to cancer. Forced to face mortality, I had barely slept since the funeral. I needed relief and hoped an affair with my friends would bring it. I wanted to do something hard, but that’s not what I had in mind.


The first day, we gather before dawn in the parking lot of my church in the Saint-Louis suburb and convoy six and a half hours north, in two vans and my old sedan. In the afternoon, we are on the Ice Age Trail, not far from Madison, 10 men in various stages of middle age. We travel a winding dirt road over hills and through thick forest. Yellow rectangles called flames painted on trees mark the path, which crosses some rural roads. I bounce back and forth, eager to lead, just as eager to stand back and talk.

We all belong to an outdoor fitness group, and I often organize physical challenges like 250 mile bike rides, canoe trips on the Missouri River, or 100 burpees a day for a month. Today’s 15-mile hike is the first stop on a concocted route through southern Wisconsin. But it’s easy to get lost in the present moment here. As when the trees separate, revealing a small lake rippling with the wind. The day is three stages away from perfection. Back at the start of the trail, the mechanic rolls his ankle and tumbles down the stairs to the parking lot. In no time, it swells to the size of her calf.

Biking the 52-mile Glacial Drumlin State Trail, a converted railroad track in Wisconsin.
Photograph by Spenser Heaps

Back in our Airbnb, I take a private room, hoping it will help me sleep. Instead, I turn around for four hours, worried about his ankle.

It’s worse the next morning, with 20 miles to go. The doctor, a gastroenterologist, wraps the ankle jokingly: “I can finally use my first aid kit. On the track, I study the mechanic’s stride from behind. He limps and his right shoe comes off with every step. He keeps up the pace, but I can’t help but worry. What if his ankle broke six miles from the car?

After a dark and menacing stretch of path thick with bushes and weeds, you descend into another clear stretch of undergrowth. The pines stripped of their low branches look like scattered telephone poles that form an optical illusion, as if I can see endlessly. I see aging metaphors everywhere, even in the leaves’ apparent resistance to changing color.

There is no resistance: death is coming for all of us, and it is coming for me sooner than I would like. It’s easy to look back on my first 50 years and wonder what I’ve done with my life. I try not to, but it’s one of the uncomfortable realities of being in my 50s: Sometimes it’s easier to look back than it is.


The mechanic’s bike comes out of the truck with a broken tire rod, but changing an inner tube is a quick job. Soon we are sailing west on the Glacial Drumlin State Trail, a converted train line that runs 52 miles from Milwaukee to Madison, with no cars or big hills. We pass cornfields and small towns, old railroad depots and waterways. When the group stops at a gas station for snacks, the pastor and I rest in the shade of a small tunnel. The respite is short-lived. “I’m done,” sends the mechanic to the group.

His ankle is holding up, but his derailleur has snapped and his nerves are not to be outdone. We think about a solution, removing the offending part and adjusting the chain to fit, converting his 18 speed bike into a single speed hipster. This makes us move forward, albeit slower, interrupted each time the mechanic howls the chain has slipped again. Each time, we come together, turn our lights on and cheer him on as he puts it back in place by swearing.

The sky lights up in purple and orange as the sun sets behind a swamp. The insects ping against my face. My lighthouse catches a rabbit rushing through the trees. As we climb the last mound, the chain slips again and the mechanic surrenders, descending the descent to the pastor’s pickup.

That night I’m lying in my bed with my eyes wide open. The hours go by. I take cough syrup, the kind that makes you drowsy. But every time I’m about to fall asleep, I wake up with a start. My mind feels like watching fireworks, only instead of the dark sky there is a strobe light and instead of oohs and aahs I wanna scream.

I have struggled with insomnia, but never as badly as the months since I eulogized my mother. The cancer in her jaw returned last year, just around the time of the shutdown. She survived nine months, enduring shingles, a gallbladder problem and a few falls. We tried visiting my parents for the holidays, but my daughters and I tested positive for COVID-19, so we had to settle for video chat on Christmas Day. She looked like she was on the verge of death. I knew I would never see her again.

My mother was all smiles and friendly energy. If you took her to the grocery store, it could take two hours, and you would surely get to know the cashier, the manager and even the saleswoman. She didn’t want a funeral. She wanted a party, so we threw one for her when the pandemic allowed, with drinks and a taco bar. I found myself thinking about my own life and what people might say about me when it’s my turn to go. I wanted to give them a lot of material to work on. More than anything, I wanted my eulogy to be like my mother’s.

That’s how I ended up here, waiting for some sleep.


Towards the river, I can barely function. Two hours of sleep last night, 16 over four days. I cannot drive my own car. I’m trying to say something about the floor mats, but the term won’t come. I call them “the thing in the car you step on”. At the point of set-up, a bald eagle sits on an inch of sand and I watch in amazement. My brain is a butterfly without light.

I team up with the pilot because he has arms like a lumberjack and he was flying a fighter plane, so I trust his nerve. He steers the canoe as I paddle weakly ahead, munching on candy and electrolytes until I start to feel myself.

Light plays on the surface of the Wisconsin River.
Photograph by Spenser Heaps

As the afternoon heat wears off, we find an island to spend the night. I set up my tent and inflate my mattress and pillow, ready to pass out. Instead, I mobilize to enjoy tacos and fireside stories with my friends. The soft sand makes my best bed all week, and that’s a good thing.

In the middle of the morning of the fifth day, the canoe is stuck and so are my friends, trapped by their own weight. Someone has to come out. It’s risky. They wear life jackets, but they could still be sucked under the tree or dragged downstream. The doctor goes first, standing on a slippery branch to stabilize himself before sliding. Another team pulls him towards the shore. Now it’s the pastor’s turn. He is my pastor. His wife teaches my daughter the piano. Her children go to the youth group with mine. He gets off the boat and disappears into the water.

Go back up, man.

POP BACK UP.

Finally, her salt and pepper hair resurfaces.

The canoe gave way, and he held it against the tide until we could tow it to shore.

Later, we stop at a roadside restaurant where Amish families parade in horse-drawn carriages. We reek of sweat and mud, and I feel sorry for the waiter. There is no vegan menu, so the doctor has ordered his first burger in years. I soak fried catfish in tartar sauce while the pilot prepares a second meal. We are already reliving our great, exhausting and frightening adventure.

I’m 50, and no, I won’t live forever. In fact, I am closer to the end than the beginning. It is disturbing to say the least.

But I want to stay focused on what still awaits me. I want to make the most of my talents, including the ability to form and strengthen deep and meaningful relationships. It’s a way of remembering my mother and honoring what she taught me.

I know there will be ups and downs, accidents, injuries and mechanical breakdowns. But there will also be some awesome, sweet, little moments that I never want to forget, like the taste of tartar sauce over fried catfish at a roadside dinner with my best friends. I want more of this.

This story appears in the November issue of Déseret Magazine. Learn more about how to subscribe.


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