Four are cited for illegally hiking the closed Sacred Falls Trail in Hawaii

Four hikers have been cited for ignoring ‘No Trespassing’ signs to follow a trail where eight people were killed on Mother’s Day 21 years ago.

Adventurers Daylan Weber, 28, and Joshua Jenkins, 29, both of Honolulu, Hawaii, Julieta Garnil, 29, of Argentina, and David Grossman, 37, of Brazil, were arrested by officers on Saturday from the DLNR to Sacred Falls.

Three others were warned to leave the illegal trail, which was closed to the public in 1999 due to the danger of falling rocks, Hawaii News Now reported.

The group that left without citations was at the trailhead but admitted to seeing the “No Trespassing” signs.

Adventurers Daylan Weber, 28, and Joshua Jenkins, 29, both of Honolulu, Hawaii, Julieta Garnil, 29, of Argentina, and David Grossman, 37, of Brazil, were arrested by officers on Saturday from the DLNR to Sacred Falls.

Three other people were warned to leave the illegal trail, which was closed to the public in 1999 due to the danger of falling rocks, Hawaii News Now reported.

Three other people were warned to leave the illegal trail, which was closed to the public in 1999 due to the danger of falling rocks, Hawaii News Now reported.

Eight people were killed in the closed national park on the north shore of the Hawaiian island of Oahu on May 9, 1999.

During the island’s deadliest natural disaster, rocks and boulders dislodged and rolled down the gorge before landing on hikers as they enjoyed picnics and sunbathing around 2:30 p.m. .

“Little by little, people have to realize that there is a reason why they call it sacred falls and the rocks keep falling and we encourage people to consider that,” said Fagota Tataipu Jr. , DOCARE officer.

“There’s a reason we closed the area, because of that tragedy we had in 1999.”

In the island's deadliest natural disaster in 1999, rocks and boulders dislodged and rolled down the gorge before landing on hikers as they enjoyed picnics and sunbathing towards 2:30 p.m. on Mother's Day.  Pictured is one of the injured

In the island’s deadliest natural disaster in 1999, rocks and boulders dislodged and rolled down the gorge before landing on hikers as they enjoyed picnics and sunbathing towards 2:30 p.m. on Mother’s Day. Pictured is one of the injured

The park is in the forested Koolau Range, about 30 miles north of Honolulu.  The falls (pictured) spill into a pool, accessed by a 3.5km path at the base of a cliff

The park is in the forested Koolau Range, about 30 miles north of Honolulu. The falls (pictured) spill into a pool, accessed by a 3.5km path at the base of a cliff

Despite the park’s closed status, many risk-takers still roam the trail, with some even offering a review on alltrails.com.

Four months ago, a hiker wrote, “The fear of getting caught made my heart race more than the trail itself.

The group that left without citations were at the start of the trail but admitted to seeing the signs

The group that left without citations were at the start of the trail but admitted to seeing the ‘No Trespassing’ signs

“It’s a dangerous track and I would encourage anyone considering extreme caution. We walked in a light rain in the middle of winter.

“Certainly not ideal conditions as it is very slippery and prone to landslides. There were several fallen trees and tire sized rocks as recently as a week ago.

“That being said, the ending was absolutely breathtaking and there’s something mystical about being isolated in the middle of a misty gorge.”

Three months ago, another person wrote: “I did this for the first time in February. It rained on us twice, once while we were at the waterfall and rocks started falling.

‘I wouldn’t recommend going while it’s raining. Nice waterfall at the end. Be sure to be respectful and bring an offering.

Others warned that the trail was too dangerous and not worth the risk.

One said, “Don’t hike this trail, it’s closed for a reason. I did this hike in 1997 and it was awesome. It’s too dangerous now.

Two women comforted themselves near the site of the avalanche as groups gathered to help rescue efforts

Two women comforted themselves near the site of the avalanche as groups gathered to help rescue efforts

Friends and family hold hands and pray for victims of deadly natural disaster

Friends and family hold hands and pray for victims of deadly natural disaster

Despite the park's closed status, many risk takers are still <a class=hiking the trail, with some even offering a review on alltrails.com” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Despite the park’s closed status, many risk takers are still hiking the trail, with some even offering a review on alltrails.com

Eight people were killed in the closed national park on May 9, 1999

Eight people were killed in the closed national park on May 9, 1999

After the 1999 disaster, volunteers had to pull bodies from a pile of rubble after a cliff caved in above tourists as they took in the view at the base of the 90ft waterfall.

The dead included Aaron Bann, 31, of Placentia, Jennifer Johnson, 24, of Canoga Park, Scott Huling, 36, of Hickam Air Force Base in Oahu and Danielle Williams, seven, of Honolulu, according to the bureau. from the Honolulu Medical Examiner.

“There were bodies everywhere,” said David Pahk, a volunteer with the Sacred Falls Assistance Program. Honolulu Star-Bulletin at the time.

“I carried bodies alive and dead, with head wounds, broken arms and legs, split skulls. Everyone was helping.

The park is in the forested Koolau Range, about 30 miles north of Honolulu. The falls pour into a pool, accessible by a 3.5 km path at the base of a cliff.

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