Tucsonan talks about ‘playing golf in sub-zero temperatures’ in Antarctica | Arizona Wildcats

TUCSON — Santiago Murillo, a die-hard U of A fan who many on campus affectionately refer to as “Tomahawk,” talks about his trip to Antarctica, where he compared hitting a golf ball at the South Pole to an astronaut swinging a club golf on the moon in 1971.

Here’s more as seen on Monday night’s News 4 Tucson sports show:

Santiago Murillo, a die-hard U of A fan who many on campus affectionately refer to as “Tamahawk,” talks about his trip to Antarctica, where he compared hitting a golf ball at the South Pole to an astronaut swinging a golf club on the moon in 1971. Here are more sports shows as seen on KVOA.


Santiago “Tomahawk” Murillo is a popular super-fan and is known among U of A circles in the sports world – especially when he dresses up as historic Arizona player “John Button” with pads and old-fashioned football gear.

However, many don’t know that Murillo overcame a near-death accident, to continue his work with scientists in Antarctica in hopes of saving the world from the effects of climate change.

Here is the special report seen on News 4 Tucson:

Santiago “Tamahawk” Murillo is a popular super fan and is known among U of A circles in the sports world – especially when he dresses up as historic Arizona player “John Button” with pads and old fashioned football equipment.

However, many don’t know that Murillo overcame a near-death accident, to continue his work with scientists in Antarctica in hopes of saving the world from the effects of climate change. Here is the special feature seen on News-4-Tucson: Paul Cicala of News 4 Tucson goes in depth in a special feature titled “Wildcat Comeback”.


Former Pueblo High Warrior and ardent U of A “John Buttons” fan Santiago Murillo is an avid cyclist who suffered a serious accident near downtown and I-10.

It has now taken more than four years of multiple and intensive surgeries and physical therapies just to get him able to walk again and no longer use a wheelchair, crutches or cane.

Murillo’s comeback included intensive boxing training, underwater physiotherapy and cycling.

Santiago Murillo, who his friends affectionately call “Tomahawk”, makes an unlikely comeback that goes beyond his amazing survival story.






Santiago Murillo (alias: Tomahawk). The popular University of Alberta alumni stops for a photo with fans and media at numerous Wildcat football games.


As a member of the National Geographic Society, Murillo returned to his first love, science.

At the end of October and November last year, Murillo volunteered to take part in a scientific expedition and a supply mission to the inhospitable continent of Antarctica.

“Humanity is in complete denial of the damage we are causing to our environment,” Murillo said, “Unfortunately, we don’t live long enough to notice the irreversible changes and damage we are causing to our own planet.”

Murillo was part of a group of scientists from 32 countries who traveled to Antarctica for ongoing scientific and investigative studies regarding the effects of global climate change.

“It Happened Last Week: The Effects of Climate Change. Look at the polar vortex that has affected the United States,” Murillo said.

As Murillo put it, “(there are) the highly possible effects of an impending viral/microbial global catastrophe, as well as the magnetic pole shift that is already taking place on our planet.”






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UofA & Pueblo High Alum Santiago Murillo’s incredible comeback story and his mission to help raise awareness about global warming.


At the age of 16, Pueblo High School, Stanford, and Arizona alumnus Santiago Murillo was part of a published science experiment that gave way to the use of liquid medications that avoided extensive surgical procedures on the patients with various conditions of the pancreas and gallbladder. mention of the Nobel committee in medicine and science.

He was an assistant to his mentor at the VA hospital, Margarito Chavez. “I did whatever it took for the advancement of science,” Murillo said.






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Santiago Murillo at a University of Arizona Pep Rally.


Murillo has been recognized and highly respected in various academic circles, from science to law.

Of the approximately 7.5 billion people who inhabit our planet today, Murillo says he is just one of 11,032 living members of the National Geographic Society. He was inducted in 2006.

His generosities have also been recognized by United States Olympic boxing teams in training techniques and defensive strategies. Murillo said, “There’s no better workout than a full boxing workout.”






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Santiago Murillo at a pep rally after filming live with News 4 Tucson’s Paul Cicala.


Paul Cicala of News 4 Tucson first reported on Santiago “TOMAHAWK” Murillo in June 2016, when he was involved in a horrific biking accident that left him paralyzed from the base of his neck down for an excruciating 19 hours.

The accident happened while he was training for the Tour De Tucson. He went from a wheelchair, to a walker, to crutches, and then to a cane.

It has now been 4 years since that horrible day that Santiago Murillo somehow survived.

“My God!” exclaimed Murillo reflecting on that day, “It was scary to be completely honest with you, but I survived.”






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Despite all he’s done, Murillo says his greatest accomplishment, “was teaching Mama-TOMAHAWK how to read and write in two languages, and getting her 1985 GED in two languages.

“My mom raised us on waitress tips,” said Murillo, who grew up in the projects just south of downtown Tucson, “She taught me to never give up.”

Santiago TOMAHAWK Murillo defines perseverance and tenacity. “You can’t measure a volunteer’s heart,” Murillo said.

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